Back in 1991 there was an Autodesk DOS program called James Gleick’s CHAOS: The Software., written by Josh Gordon, Rudy Rucker and John Walker. It allowed you to generate visual representations of a lot of Chaos Theory’s best math, and Rudy wrote most of the algorithms, except for John Walkers Fractal Landscapes algorithms. Rudy has now posted it online over at GitHub as a free open source download under the GNU license. It will run on pretty much anything that has DOSBox installed on it, which is itself free open source software that runs on Windows, Linux, MACs, Raspbian and more.

New York City is rolling out its LinkNCY FREE Gigabit Wifi access points, which take the place of existing phone booths. When they are done they plan to have 7,500 public hubs throughout the city, each including USB charging ports and a touchscreen web browsing display for those without tablets or smart phones. To defray the cost of this free public service they are using two 55-inch advertising displays at each hub site, which they estimate will generate more than $500 million in add revenue over the next dozen years.

The first very simple Quantum Computer Calculation has been made using room temperature silicon rather than ultra-cold superconductors. This was done by a team lead by Andrew Dzurak of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, and it could mean true Quantum Computing is almost here. If that is the case, the world is about to go through another paradigm shift just as intense as the personal computer revolution itself. You can read about it at the New Scientist Basic Quantum Computation article.